The Birth Control Movement:  The Part Played by Eugenics and Racism

by Natasha Furtado Dalomba, MD (’24)  For many, “birth control” or contraception is a path to achieving their goals for their bodies and their lives. As a pediatrician, I often frame contraception in this way for my patients. They can have better/fewer/less painful periods, or perhaps improve their acne or mood, and of course prevent …

The Birth Control Movement:  The Part Played by Eugenics and Racism Read More »

Preventing Ingestion of Edibles

by Michelle Crowley, MD, MPH (’24) As more states across the United States have legalized marijuana, the rate of accidental ingestions of edible marijuana and phone calls to poison control centers have risen exponentially. We have seen an increase in the number of hospitalizations of children secondary to ingestion of marijuana edibles. There are many …

Preventing Ingestion of Edibles Read More »

Behavioral Restraints and Isolation: The Child Experience

by Lauren Irvin, DO (’24) During the pediatric mental health epidemic following the COVID-19 pandemic, the needs of the inpatient pediatric mental health population were pushed to the forefront. Strategies for both patient and staff safety became the focus, with many adaptive and preventative approaches applied in general hospital wards for patients awaiting psychiatric placement. …

Behavioral Restraints and Isolation: The Child Experience Read More »

Tracheoesophageal Fistula & Esophageal Atresia

By Shirley Mo, MD (’24)   Tracheoesophageal fistulas (TEFs) and esophageal atresia (EA) represent one of the most common congenital anomalies of the respiratory tract, with an incidence in approximately 1 in 3500 births.    Embryology: The trachea and esophagus develop from a common primitive foregut. Approximately at 4 weeks of gestation, the developing respiratory …

Tracheoesophageal Fistula & Esophageal Atresia Read More »

When Timing is Everything: A Case Report of Prompt Treatment and Recovery for Infant Botulism

by Emma Livne, MD (’24) Case  A 7-week-old female infant who was born full term with no PMH and normal newborn screen presented to the ED with 3 days of decreased oral intake, constipation, poor suck, weak cry, and hypotonia. She presented while on vacation, shortly after arriving to Rhode Island from their home in …

When Timing is Everything: A Case Report of Prompt Treatment and Recovery for Infant Botulism Read More »

Nirsevimab for the prevention of RSV in infants

 by Ioanna Barkas, MD (’24)   The FDA recently approved the availability of Nirsevimab (trade name of Beyfortus) for the 2023-2024 viral season for the prevention of RSV lower respiratory tract disease in infants. Given the novelty of this prophylaxis and the media coverage of RSV, we will receive questions from parents regarding the efficacy and safety …

Nirsevimab for the prevention of RSV in infants Read More »

Transfusion Reactions

by Elizabeth Haxton MD (’24) — Transfusion reactions range from common and easily treated to rare and life threatening. It is important for pediatric residents to be able to identify transfusion reactions and differentiate between the different types. Below is a brief summary of each type of acute transfusion reaction.   Transfusion Associated Lung Injury …

Transfusion Reactions Read More »

Did we find the cause of SIDS?: A critical review of “Butyrylcholinesterase is a potential biomarker for SIDS”

by Hawa Tunkara, MD (’23)

Health Equity carries many definitions, but a central theme is: having equal opportunity to live a healthy life 12345.  Physicians often find themselves taking care of a patient whose health is a product of factors they cannot not exactly control. We can all likely think of a patient whose social circumstance created barriers in their treatment plan. We are trained to take care of the patient in front of us. However, if healthy equity aligns with our work where is our place to tackle the structures that make our patient’s sick?