Nirsevimab for the prevention of RSV in infants

 by Ioanna Barkas, MD (’24)   The FDA recently approved the availability of Nirsevimab (trade name of Beyfortus) for the 2023-2024 viral season for the prevention of RSV lower respiratory tract disease in infants. Given the novelty of this prophylaxis and the media coverage of RSV, we will receive questions from parents regarding the efficacy and safety …

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Transfusion Reactions

by Elizabeth Haxton MD (’24) — Transfusion reactions range from common and easily treated to rare and life threatening. It is important for pediatric residents to be able to identify transfusion reactions and differentiate between the different types. Below is a brief summary of each type of acute transfusion reaction.   Transfusion Associated Lung Injury …

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Did we find the cause of SIDS?: A critical review of “Butyrylcholinesterase is a potential biomarker for SIDS”

by Hawa Tunkara, MD (’23)

Health Equity carries many definitions, but a central theme is: having equal opportunity to live a healthy life 12345.  Physicians often find themselves taking care of a patient whose health is a product of factors they cannot not exactly control. We can all likely think of a patient whose social circumstance created barriers in their treatment plan. We are trained to take care of the patient in front of us. However, if healthy equity aligns with our work where is our place to tackle the structures that make our patient’s sick?

On the road towards Health Equity: finding an intersection between public health and medicine

by Hawa Tunkara, MD (’23)

Health Equity carries many definitions, but a central theme is: having equal opportunity to live a healthy life 12345.  Physicians often find themselves taking care of a patient whose health is a product of factors they cannot not exactly control. We can all likely think of a patient whose social circumstance created barriers in their treatment plan. We are trained to take care of the patient in front of us. However, if healthy equity aligns with our work where is our place to tackle the structures that make our patient’s sick?

Growth Attenuation Therapy in Children with Severe Physical and Cognitive Disabilities

by Julia R. Donner, MD (’23)

The goal of therapy for Ashley’s family and of those like hers is to prolong care time at home within the family and make this care more feasible to prevent transition to facilities. Lifting and transferring of children becomes more challenging the larger they grow and formation of bed sores and other side effects of being sedentary become a larger issue with increasing size. Growth attenuation could potentially prevent these effects and allow for better quality of life for these children as they age and are able to remain at home. 

HORMONES AND THE HEART

Julia Donner, MD (’23)

Prolongation of QT interval carries increased risk for sudden life threatening arrythmias, specifically torsades de pointes (TdP) and sudden cardiac death (SCD). Female gender is a risk factor for arrythmias, specifically drug related TdP, and both endogenous and exogenous sex hormones affect the QT interval. The impact of gender and gonadal steroids on cardiac rhythm and arrhythmias is recognized and is more prominent in females than in males. There is a higher propensity towards arrhythmia in females than males and rate corrected QT intervals are longer in females than males. While QTc intervals are longer in women than in men, this difference only becomes apparent after puberty suggesting that sex hormones may be responsible. In addition, progesterone, not estrogen has dominant effect on ventricular repolarization in women. Androgens are known to be protective and higher serum progesterone concentrations may be protective against drug-induced QT interval lengthening. 

Childhood Obesity in COVID-19: Ways to Counsel

by Leslia Gonzalez (’22)
reviewed by Celeste Corcoran

Childhood obesity has been a growing problem for many years. The COVID pandemic has unfortunately exacerbated this. A study published in JAMA that utilized the Kaiser Permanente Southern California population found an increase in childhood obesity across all ages, with the largest being within the age group of 5-11 yo. There was an increase of approximately 9%. We have seen this trend amongst our patient population as well.